The American consumer is getting snowed in by ongoing and largely successful efforts of old telecom to perpetuate their proprietary, antiquated and restrictive business models in new media. This issue is pivotal to the future of free thought and expression in the United States of America.

Senate Chair Takes on FTC in Net Neutrality Fight – News and Analysis by PC Magazine
Mark Cooper, director of research for the Consumer Federation of America. ISPs are not talking about ensuring quicker consumer access to movies online, they’re talking about giving themselves a leg up on the competition via controlled access, Cooper said.

“The FTC and the [Department of Justice] have cheered the decision FCC to allow a cozy duopoly to come into existence, claiming that two [providers are] enough,” Cooper said. Meanwhile, the U.S. “dribbles out bandwidth at 10 to 20 times what people pay around the world” while the nation’s broadband penetration rate continues to fall behind that of other countries, he said.

“The nations that have passed us have relied on the very policy that we used 30 years ago – to provide innovation and consumer friendly services,” Cooper concluded.

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What you don’t get in the news is a vision of the Internet that big corporations (telecoms) would create if they succeed in stifling net neutrality. Imagine an Internet where the available content is as limited as the evening news is limited in fully describing all that is occurring in the universe. The stifling of net neutrality is the stifling of innovation and freedom. Write your state and federal representatives; You can bet telecoms and cable are expending all means to support the stifling of “net neutrality” legislation.

Senate Chair Takes on FTC in Net Neutrality Fight – News and Analysis by PC Magazine
At issue is the topic of net neutrality, which essentially guarantees equal online access so that every Web site on the Internet, whether it is a major companys portal or a homemade storefront, has the same right to speed and access. Some major Internet service providers, however, have called for a system that would allow for tiered, rate-based access.